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Nocturnal enuresis: An approach to assessment and treatment

By A.P. Bayne and S.J. Skoog.

Pediatrics in Review, Volume 35, Issue 8, August 2014, Pages 327-335

Editor’s comments:

This is an excellent document for caregivers to have a basic knowledge or an up to date overview of assessment and treatment of children with bedwetting.

Abstract

On the basis of strong evidence, although primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (PMNE) is common and most children will outgrow the condition spontaneously, the psychological effect to the child can be significant and represents the main reason for treatment of these children.

  • On the basis of international consensus panels, treatment of PMNE should be targeted toward the specific type of bedwetting patterns the child has, using bladder diary, sleep history, and daytime elimination concerns as a guide (Table 3).
  • On the basis of international consensus panels, it is important for the primary care physician to be able to differentiate children with PMNE from children with nonmonosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (NMNE) and secondary nocturnal enuresis.
  • On the basis of international consensus panels, children with NMNE should have their underlying voiding or stool problem addressed before initiation of therapy for the nocturnal enuresis.
  • On the basis of strong evidence, both the bedwetting alarm and desmopressin are considered first-line therapy for children with PMNE.

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